That Rule Against Bald Skies

Lots of landscape photographers will tell you not to shoot when the sky is bare.  Cloudless skies make for boring images. Moose Peterson calls them bald skies.   And most of the time the rule holds up.  Still that rule like all the others are meant to be broken.  If I followed the rules I probably should have just left my camera at home last Saturday. There wasn’t a cloud in the sky ( Florida in February, 83 degrees and lots of sun ).

Still my eye caught the completely still water of the pond at Epcot. When you see something of interest you shoot now and ask questions later. Later like when you have the image open in Lightroom.

Still Life – Fujifilm X-T2 XF 16-55mm F/2.8 R LM WR

For me this image works because there are no clouds in the sky. Several reasons why. I think the dark blue at the top and bottom of the image holds the eye in the image where you then have time to see all the colorful things going on between the Monorail track and it’s reflection. Also Spaceship Earth, the big dome, might have gotten lost in the clouds had the been there.

Don’t try to stick to much to the rules. Shoot the shots.

Although I like the color image with no clouds, converting it to black and white does not work at all for me. Since the center section has no color the eye doesn’t go there. So the rule works, or it doesn’t.

Images shot with Fujifilm X-T2 and XF 16-55mm F/2.8 R LM WR


Images and Rules

Light and Shadow
Light And Shadow

This is an image I shot on my recent vacation. In this shot I was able to visualize the outcome before I even framed it up in the camera.  I knew what I wanted to capture and was able to get the result I was looking for.  The Mrs and I were sampling a bit of Merlot in the Italy Pavillon at Epcot in Walt Disney World.

I saw the shadow on the wall which show the lighter areas of the sun passing through the glass of the lamp. I liked the tonality. I shot a couple of shots and this was the one that best matched what I was seeing.

Emotionally I think the image has impact.  The balance was good and the colors match what I saw as I was sitting there.

Afterwards I was thinking about photographic rules and which one I had followed and the ones I broke.  I shot this about 1pm on a crystal clear day.  It wasn’t about waiting for better light as the light I has was perfect to creating the shadow of the lamp.  I think I may have got the rule of thirds about right as the lamp itself was in the upper right third while the shadow was in the lower left.

If all you can say about an image you took is that “I Nailed the rule of thirds” that rule probably doesn’t matter.  What really matters that the image tells the story.  In this case it did for me.

Shot with Fujifilm X-T2 Fujinon XF 16-55mm F2.8 R LM WR

ISO 200 F11 1/600sec 42.7mm

Carnival

Carnival

Even with the best of intentions you sometimes get really interesting images by accident. I apparently did not have the tripod head tightened down when I clicked the shutter. The camera drooped down during the 2.5 second exposure.

Which brings us to the point that when you have 2.6 seconds to play you can make some interesting images. Another possibility would be to zoom the lens during a long exposure. Always experiment, always be looking for the unexpected. There is no such thing a a mistake once the shutter button is pressed.

Equipment used for this image:

Fujinon XF 16-55mm F2.8 R LM WR at Amazon

Fujifilm X-T2 Camera at Amazon

Shot at F16 2.6 seconds ISO 200.